Proper Twenty~Three 10/11/2020

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The Still Point: A Time of Meditation and Reflection

The Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost: Proper 23

… At the still point of the turning world. Neither flesh nor fleshless;
Neither from nor towards; at the still point, there the dance is,
But neither arrest nor movement. And do not call it fixity,
Where past and future are gathered. Neither movement from nor towards,
Neither ascent nor decline. Except for the point, the still point,
There would be no dance, and there is only the dance…

 

T.S. Eliot, Burnt Norton

Peace on each one who comes in need;

Peace on each one who comes in joy. 

 Peace on each one who offers prayers;

  Peace on each one who offers song.

 Peace of the Maker, Peace of the Son,

Peace of the Spirit, the Triune One.  

 

Opening Prayer

Praise to you, God, for all your work among us. Yours is the vigor in creation, yours is the impulse in our new discoveries.
Make us adventurous, yet reverent and hopeful in all we do. Amen.

The Gospel                                                                                                 Matthew 22:1-14

Once more Jesus spoke to the people in parables, saying: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who gave a wedding banquet for his son. He sent his slaves to call those who had been invited to the wedding banquet, but they would not come. Again he sent other slaves, saying, ‘Tell those who have been invited: Look, I have prepared my dinner, my oxen and my fat calves have been slaughtered, and everything is ready; come to the wedding banquet.’ But they made light of it and went away, one to his farm, another to his business, while the rest seized his slaves, mistreated them, and killed them. The king was enraged. He sent his troops, destroyed those murderers, and burned their city. Then he said to his slaves, ‘The wedding is ready, but those invited were not worthy. Go therefore into the main streets, and invite everyone you find to the wedding banquet.’ Those slaves went out into the streets and gathered all whom they found, both good and bad; so the wedding hall was filled with guests.

“But when the king came in to see the guests, he noticed a man there who was not wearing a wedding robe, and he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you get in here without a wedding robe?’ And he was speechless. Then the king said to the attendants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, and throw him into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’ For many are called, but few are chosen.”

   

 

Poem: Love (III)                                                                                            by George Herbert

 

Love bade me welcome. Yet my soul drew back

        Guilty of dust and sin.

But quick-eyed Love, observing me grow slack

         From my first entrance in,

Drew nearer to me, sweetly questioning,

         If I lacked any thing.

 

A guest, I answered, worthy to be here:

        Love said, You shall be he.

I the unkind, ungrateful? Ah my dear,

        I cannot look on thee.

Love took my hand, and smiling did reply,

       Who made the eyes but I?

 

Truth Lord, but I have marred them: let my shame

        Go where it doth deserve.

And know you not, says Love, who bore the blame?

        My dear, then I will serve.

You must sit down, says Love, and taste my meat:

        So I did sit and eat.

______

Reflection

There is a lot going on in the parable of the wedding feast that is today’s gospel. But my mind was drawn to this sentence, ‘Go therefore into the main streets, and invite everyone you find to the wedding banquet.’ Those slaves went out into the streets and gathered all whom they found, both good and bad; so the wedding hall was filled with guests. What would it be like for just one of the people unexpectedly invited to a wedding banquet?

The poem by George Herbert provides an intimate glimpse into a conversation between Love and the Soul, in which Love provides the gentle invitation to be the guest at the table. “You must sit down, says Love, and taste my meat: So I did sit and eat.”

 

Questions/Prompts for Meditation:

Does the poem provide a particular entry point for you into the parable, or the parable into the poem? 

For a recitation of the poem by Ralph Fiennes, go to: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kZSH4iywhY

There are two choral settings of this poem you may want to listen to as well.

By Judith Weir:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a60wg6_caaw

By Ralph Vaughan Williams:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bx1oWf2zPcY

                                                                                            

Prayers 

We bring before God someone whom we have met or remembered today  

 

We bring to God someone who is hurting tonight and needs our prayer

 

We bring to God a troubled situation in our world 

 

We bring to God, silently, someone whom we find hard to forgive or trust

 

We bring ourselves to God that we might grow in generosity of spirit, clarity of mind, and warmth of affection

 

We offer our thanks to God for the blessings in our lives

 

We name before God those who have died.

 

Gracious God, you hear all our prayers: those we speak aloud, those we hold in our hearts, and those prayers for which we have no words. Hear the prayers of your people, and grant them as may be best for us, for the sake of your holy name. Amen.

 

Accept our thanks for all you have done, O God. Our hands were empty, and you filled them.

 

May Christ’s holy, healing, enabling Spirit be with us every step of the way, and be our guide as our road changes and turns, and the blessing of God our Creator, Redeemer and Giver of life be among us now and remain with us forever. Amen.

 

Posted in The Still Point.