MUSICAL WEEKLY  MARCH 22, 2016

22 March, 2016

In this issue:

· A Query about SMCC’s concerts last weekend (consider it a survey)

· What’s next for SMCC?

· Holy Week at St. Andrew’s

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Our performances of the Charles Wood “Passion According to St. Mark” were very good this last week, and I was very touched to see so many audience members literally in tears afterwards, expressing how poignant it was, and exclaiming in wonder that this work was not better known, so powerful is it.

My only disappointment was the sparsity of the audience. 355 total (110, 87, 158 at each concert respectively). Normally if we do a Lenten-themed program, it turns out to be our second-largest attendance of the year (after Christmas, of course). This one fell a full 100 people short of our projected (budgeted) audience, and 125 short of last year’s April concerts.

I’m not scolding here – just genuinely curious as to what might have lowered turnout. If any of you has some insight into this (i.e. you’re an SMCC “regular” but didn’t attend this concert – why?), I’d appreciate the feedback. Possible explanations that have occurred to me might be:

· It conflicted with other concerts I attended (CBE did Bach St. John the same weekend)

· I thought the concert sounded too religious

· I’m less inclined to attend when the entire concert is comprised of a single work, and that work is by a composer I’ve never heard of

· I was planning to go Friday night, but the snow that fell earlier in the day kept me away

· It’s Spring Break – I was otherwise engaged

· ______________ (fill in the blank)

Anyway, those who attended the concert where quite moved; our soloists did magnificently; the choir was absolutely marvelous (rarely have I felt the singers have been so on-the-money); Richard Robertson played passionately (especially on Sunday); Greg Robbins’ pre-concert lecture was masterful, and quite well attended. It was a triumph from start to finish; so I was especially disappointed that it was not heard by more people. I’m only aware of one recording of the work that is currently available (Choir of Jesus College, Cambridge – and to my ears it’s a bit muddy), so I’m considering recording the work myself…!

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St. Martin’s Chamber Choir makes its next appearances in conjunction with the Pro Musica Colorado Chamber Orchestra in two performances of the Mozart Requiem under the direction of maestra Cynthia Katsarelis, April 8 and 9. The Requiem itself hardly needs an introduction; but this performance uses a particular version of the work as follows:

There are a number of versions out there, as Mozart left the work unfinished at his death. His student Süssmayr first finished it, and performance of this version has been the norm for 230 years; but other versions have been attempted, mainly due to the feeling that Süssmayr was, at best, unequal to the task, and at worst, a second-rate hack. H. C. Robbins-Landon did a radical rethinking of it; and Robert Levin has done a re-composition that has been recently popular. In both, the arrangers eradicated what they felt was clearly by Süssmayr, and replaced it either with something else by Mozart, or by a composition of their own that they felt was superior to Süssmayr. (Privately, I have serious reservations about these, but that’s another conversation.)

Less radical is a version by Franz Beyer, which, rather than eradicating and/or replacing anything, merely alters the voicing and instrumentation to correct what seem to be infelicities in the writing. This is the version that will be used in this performance. For all intents and purposes, what the audience will be hearing is the Mozart Requiem as completed by Süssmayr, with corrections of instrumentation and voice-leading rather than anything unfamiliar or new. (For my money, this is the kind of alteration I can enthusiastically get behind.)

Get tickets from PMCCO directly at http://www.promusicacolorado.org/

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Holy Week – the most solemn in the year, and marked by some of the most beautiful music Christendom has produced. Here’s what I’ve programmed for the services at St. Andrew’s, with a brief description of each service:

Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 7:00pm: Stations of the Cross

10 different settings of Adoramus te, Christe, by Palestrina; Anonymous 13th century; Mariano Garau; Padre Martini; G. A. Perti; G. M. Nanino; G. Pitoni; Q. Gasparini; C. Giffen; G. Verhallen. Also, Gregorian Plainchant.

“O Lord, rebuke me not” by Charles Wood (1866-1926)

In this service, an officiant and acolytes move around to each of the 14 Stations of the Cross mounted on the walls of the church; a brief reading and prayer accompanies each one, and then as the procession moves to the next Station, a setting of the Adoramus te is sung (plainchant 4 times with congregation; 10 others to settings by the above composers). I love hearing the differences in the settings of this same text, from Medieval, Renaissance, Classical, Romantic, and 20th century composers. Personally, this is perhaps my favorite service of the week.

Wednesday, March 23, 2016, 7:00pm: Tenebrae

7 Psalm Chants

Lamentations of Jeremiah (Lessons 1-3) by Timothy J. Krueger (2001)

Holy Week Responsories (Lessons 1-3) by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Christus factus est by Felice Anerio (c.1560-1614)

Miserere mei by Gregorio Allegri (c.1582-1652)

This is many people’s favorite service of the week, with the gradual extinguishing of lights until the service ends in complete darkness (the famous Allegri Miserere is very powerful in the dark!). 99% of the service is sung, and 60% of that is psalm chants, so the repetition of the alternatim is very hypnotic and solemn.

Thursday, March 24, 2016, 7:00pm; Maundy Thursday

Anthems at the Footwashing:

“Peace is my last gift,” Plainsong, Mode 1, harm. James McGregor (b. 1930) and MB Krueger (2005)

“Lord, do you wash my feet?” Gregorian Chant, Mode 5

“Drop, drop slow tears” by Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)

“This is my commandment,” variously attrib. to Thomas Tallis (c.1505-1585) or William Mundy (d. 1591)

“A new commandment” by Richard Shephard (b.1949)

“God is love” by A. Gregory Murray (1905-1992)

Anthem: “Draw us in the Spirit’s tether” by Harold W. Friedell (1905-1958)

Fraction Anthem: Tantum ergo by Maurice Duruflé (1903-1986)

Communion motet: Ubi caritas by Maurice Duruflé (1903‑1986)

Hymns: 315 (Song 1), 581 (Cheshire), 314 (Adoro devote), 313 (Jesu, meine Zuversicht), 320 (Lauda Sion salvatorem), 329 (Pange lingua)

This service re-enacts the Last Supper, where Jesus washed the feet of his disciples, celebrated the meal that has served as the model for Communion ever since; and, finally, prepares the church for tomorrow’s Good Friday service (and represents Jesus’ betrayal and abandonment by those whose feet he had just washed) by stripping the altar and chancel area of everything not permanently affixed, and the removing of the host (the body of Christ) from the church to an “altar of repose.” So the service begins with love and community, and ends with aloneness and abandonment – fairly powerful in the stark contrast it creates. One of my favorite moments of the church year is when, as the people sing the Pange lingua, the host (in a monstrance) is borne from the church in great solemnity by the priest, the thurifer walking backwards and bowed down in reverence…

Friday, March 25, 2016, 12:00 Noon; Good Friday

The Passion According to St. John, setting by Tomas Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)

Procession: Crux fidelis by King John IV of Portugal (d. 1656)

The Anthems at the Veneration: 3 Veneration Anthems by Timothy Krueger (2007)

Procession to the Altar of Repose: Hymn 166 (Pange lingua)

Communion motet: “O Saviour of the World” by F. A. Gore Ouseley (1825-1889)

Communion Hymn: 168 (Herzlich tut mich verlangen)

This service tells of the crucifixion. The choir sings the Passion Gospel; there is a rather Medieval moment called the ‘Veneration of the Cross’ (I’ve revived my simple but affecting 3 Anthems, written in 2007 and first performed a couple years later); and a simple communion is served from the “reserved sacrament,” consecrated the previous evening. It is an entirely a cappella service, as the organ, which played last about half-way through the Maundy Thursday service, is completely silent until half-way through the Vigil service.

Friday, March 25, 2016, 7:00pm; Good Friday: Downward to Darkness

Prelude: Passacaglia from Suite #3 (1971) by Benjamin Britten (1901-1976) (Matt Dane, violist)

• Reading: Mark 15:42-47

“Give me that Stranger” by Michael McCarthy (2010)

• Poem: “Pieta” by John Taylor

Hymn 173 (Traurigkeit)

• Poem: “I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day” by Gerard Manley Hopkins

My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? Gregorian Chant, Mode 2

• Poem: “When Death Comes” by Mary Oliver

Finale (Kontakion) from Suite #3 by Britten Britten (Matt Dane, violist

• Poem: “Sunday Morning” by Wallace Stevens

“Ah, holy Jesus” arr. by John Ferguson for choir and viola

This was a new service last year, and all agreed it was powerful and we should continue it this year. It will consist largely of the five readings/poems above, followed by a 2-3 minute period of silence, followed by the music selections listed, some choral, some congregational. The goal was to create a service of mourning, as Jesus lies in the tomb; and the silence, coupled with the dark readings and the mournful music, combine to make this a service that, uncharacteristically for Christian services, offers no hope, but dwells for a moment in sheer lamentation. This year Matt Dane joins us for the service, playing along with us on one number, and playing a couple viola solos by Benjamin Britten.

Saturday, March 26, 2016, 7:00pm; The Great Vigil of Easter

Exultet [choral underlay: Timothy J. Krueger (2011)]

“I will sing unto the Lord” by John Amner (1579-1641)

Sicut cervus by G. P. da Palestrina (1525‑1594)

Canticle: [Stanford/Krueger Gloria in excelsis]

Sequence: Great Alleluia, S70

Anthem: Te Deum in C by Charles V. Stanford (1892-1983)

Communion motet: “The Strife is O’er” by William Harris (d.1973)

Hymns: “I sing the almighty power of God” (Kingsfold), 296 (Engelberg), 199 (St. Kevin), 191 (Hyfrydol)

This is a very long service (c. 2 hours), so not for the faint of heart. But it includes some of my favorite music, including Howells’ Te Deum from his Collegium Regale service. It is the first of the three Easter services, beginning with readings that tell a story of salvific acts of God (foreshadowing the resurrection), and then the declaration of the resurrection itself about half-way through the service, when the organ is used for the first time since Maundy Thursday.

Sunday, March 27, 2016, 9:00am and 11:00am; Easter Day

Introit: Jauchzet dem Herrn by Gottfried August Homilius (1714-1785)

Anthem at the Asperging: “Most Glorious Lord of Life” by William H. Harris (1883‑1973)

Sequence: “Rise up, my Love” by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Creed: monotone harmonization in E major (“with bells”), TJK (2014)

Anthem: “Ye choirs of New Jerusalem” by Charles V. Stanford (1852‑1924)

Communion motet: “I Got me Flowers” by Daniel Burton (1984)

Hymns: 207 (Easter Hymn), 174 (Salzburg), 210 (Ellacombe), 180 (Unser Herrscher) – with C. H. H. Parry Choral Amen

This is the joyous conclusion to the week, including some old favorites of mine (the Harris and Stanford), and a new piece for us this year, by Daniel Burton. It is the one Sunday in the year where the full choir sings at both the 9 and 11 services. Sure to be full, so if you plan to come, arrive 20-30 mins. early for better seating. J

The blessing of Holy Week to one and all.

Tim

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Timothy J. Krueger

Choirmaster, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Denver

Artistic Director, St. Martin’s Chamber Choir (professional)

Affiliate Music Faculty, Metropolitan State University of Denver

 

Musical Weekly
Musical Weekly March 14, 2016

14 March, 2016

In this issue:

·         “The Passion Story” – Charles Wood’s St. Mark Passion THIS WEEKEND!

·          A couple more responses to my sermon

·         This Week (and a little of next week) at St. Andrew’s

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This often happens to me in the rehearsal process of a significant work: As we approach the concerts, I am increasingly moved by the work to be performed, and have fallen in love with it.

 

Such is the case with this Passion According to St. Mark by Charles Wood.  Emotionally powerful, musically moving, a masterful and stirring telling of a story.  Daniel Hutchings sounds truly fantastic as the Evangelist; Matthew La Cava is affecting and deeply sorrowful as Jesus; and Brian Stone is effective in portraying the ambivalence of Pilate.  The choir sounds wonderful in their various roles as turba (crowd), commentators (in the hymns and chorales), and evangelist (occasionally taking over the role of the narrator at key moments in the drama).  And Richard Robertson is making the organ accompaniments sound like a million bucks (if I may be so prosaic).  Like in December with the Herzogenberg “Die Geburt Christi,” I am wondering why the work is not generally more well-known, so effective is it in its dramatic and musical qualities.  I suppose much of the reason for its neglect falls under the rubric of what my good friend David Wilson says to me sometimes in a light moment, “There’s just so damned much good music in the world.”  True.

 

And here’s your chance to hear another rarely-performed piece of good music live with St. Martin’s Chamber Choir:

 

·         Fri., March 18, 7:30pm, Holy Cross Lutheran Church, 4500 Wadsworth Blvd., Wheat Ridge

·         Sat., March 19, 7:30pm, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 2015 Glenarm Place, Denver

·         Sun., March 20, 3:00pm, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Denver

 

REMEMBER:  Pre-concert lecture given by the incomparable Dr. Gregory Robbins, chair of Religious Studies at the University of Denver; faculty member at Iliff School of Theology (etc., etc.), one hour before each performance.  Those concerned about staking out good seating will be allowed to reserve spots for themselves in the church before the lecture. You will find me listening in at (at least) one of the lectures!

 

Advisory Notice – as the organ is in the back at St. Andrew’s, we will be performing from the back of the church (behind most of the audience).  Premium Seating at St. Andrew’s (the chairs, instead of pews) will be turned to face the rear.  Needless to say, it’s too difficult to turn the pews, and these will represent the general admission seating …

 

I would encourage advance ticket purchase for the Sunday matinee concert, as this is always quite well-attended.  These may be had at (303) 298-1970; and www.StMartinsChamberChoir.org/tickets.

 

Watch a brief explanatory video of this concert here: https://youtu.be/Eoi1N6CP_2M (or on our website, above, embedded on the home page)

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A couple more print-worthy responses to my sermon came in this week.  Here they are:

 

Here’s some wisdom from a good friend in England (hence the spelling of ‘empathise’ J):

 

I too enjoyed your sermon and found much to empathise with.  All I can add is that without doubts there are no questions and therefore no seeking for answers, and without these there is likely to be simply complete disbelief or blind faith. And blind faith can lead to the kind of fundamentalism which blights the world at the present time.  So keep doubting and seeking and creating sublime music which nourishes the listener and points them to the infinite.

 

And from closer to home, a friend in Denver (and St. Martin’s supporter):

 

I resonate with so much of what you said.  It takes me back to the early days of my marriage.  It was in the early seventies when we both sang in the choir at Holy Ghost Church.  My wife grew up Catholic but, like her five siblings, had moved away from it.  We both loved the sacred music of the early composers. We enjoyed arriving on a Sunday morning, briefly running through a mass before the service and then singing with wonderful voices. I’ve said many times that it was a musical experience, not a religious experience.  It was such a pleasure to be able to sing with others who ALL could read music and not have to spend time bringing others up to speed (I’m such a snob!)

 

I assured him I did not think him a snob (or if so, then I was one too) for enjoying musical experiences where note pounding was not necessary.

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One more Evensong before Holy Week, and this one is an all-men Evensong (four guys plus me), with the following music:

 

Thursday, 17 March, 5:45pn; Thursday in Lent 5, Choral Evensong

Preces & Responses: TJ Krueger (TTBB)

Canticle of Light: Pater supernam by Pasquale Pisari (c.1725-1778)

Psalm: 140 (plainchant)

Service: Healey Willan “Fauxbourdons”

Anthem: “The Eyes of the Lord” by Charles Wood (1866-1926)

Office Hymn: 38 (Jesu, nostra redemptio)

 

I think it will be a lovely sonic experience, with the voices of all men leading us towards the solemnities of Holy Week.

 

Then this Sunday is Palm Sunday.  Here’s the music I’ve planned:

 

March 20, 2016, Palm Sunday

Anthem at the Distribution of Palms: “Hosanna to the Son of David” by Thomas Weelkes (1576-1623)

Outdoor processional: “Ride on, ride on” to Hymn to Joy (with Bagpiper Michael Lancaster)

Anthem: Solus ad victimam by Kenneth Leighton (1929‑1988)

*Fraction Anthem: “Verily, verily I say unto you” by Thomas Tallis (c.1505‑1585)

Communion motet: Christus factus est by Anton Bruckner (1824-1896)

Hymns: 154 (Valet will ich dir geben), 458 (Love Unknown), 168 (Passion Chorale), 164 (Bangor)

 

Yes…a bagpiper!  About this time last year, Dale Adelman (of St. Philip’s Cathedral in Atlanta) read this Weekly and replied with a tale of how he best handled the outdoor procession that is an obligatory part of most Episcopal Palm Sunday services – he played (or had played) the hymn on the church carillon/bells, so that it could be heard all across the block and kept people together in their singing.  The next best thing for outdoor singing is a bagpipe, I’m convinced.  Nothing else works in keeping a congregation, strung out over an entire (or even several) city blocks, in synch with each other and singing (relatively) exuberantly.  We’ve tried trumpets; we’ve tried spacing the choir out interspersed with the congregation – nothing works, and it’s usually a musical fiasco.  For many years I begged our rector to let us do the procession without music; but all of my rectors (including the interim, so, 3) insisted that there must be music.  For as many years, I prayed that there be precipitation on Palm Sunday so we could cancel the procession (only happened once in 21 years – damned reliable Colorado sun).  So, until St. Andrew’s gets a ring of tower bells (anybody got a million bucks to donate?), I’ll use a bagpipe (even though the choice of tunes [much less keys] is extremely limited with a bagpipe, and singing 17 verses of the same hymn gets rather boring).

 

The rest of the service is nothing short of breathtaking, with one of the church’s GREAT hymns, “All glory, laud, and honor,” played with gusto on the organ inside the church to conclude the procession (the only time in Lent that I allow a descant); and two pieces guaranteed to reduce you to a puddle: Leighton’s Solus ad victimam and Bruckner’s Christus factus est.

 

Since there are ten services in Holy Week with music (there are 13 total at St. A’s, but only three are without music), here’s a preview of the first few services in Holy Week, to whet your appetite:

 

Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 7:00pm: Stations of the Cross

10 different settings of Adoramus te, Christe, by Palestrina; Anonymous 13th century; M. Garau; Padre Martini; G. A. Perti; G. M. Nanino; G. Pitoni; Q. Gasparini; C. Giffen; G. Verhallen.  Also, Gregorian Plainchant.

“O Lord, rebuke me not” by Charles Wood (1866-1926)

 

In this service, an officiant and acolytes move around to each of the 14 Stations of the Cross mounted on the walls of the church; a brief reading and prayer accompanies each one, and then as the procession moves to the next Station, a setting of the Adoramus te is sung (plainchant 4 times with congregation; 10 others to settings be the above composers – all rendered by my staff singers).  I love hearing the differences in the settings of this same text, from Medieval, Renaissance, Classical, Romantic, and 20th century composers.  Personally, this is one of my favorite services of the week.

 

Wednesday, March 23, 2016, 7:00pm: Tenebrae

7 Psalm Chants

Lamentations of Jeremiah (Lessons 1-3) by Timothy J. Krueger (2001)

Holy Week Responsories (Lessons 1-3) by Healey Willan (1880-1968)

Christus factus est by Felice Anerio (c.1560-1614)

Miserere mei by Gregorio Allegri (c.1582-1652)

 

This is many people’s favorite service of the week, with the gradual extinguishing of lights until the service ends in complete darkness (the famous Allegri Miserere, with its treble high C’s, is very powerful in the dark!).  99% of the service is sung, and 60% of that is psalm chants, so the repetition of the alternatim is very hypnotic and solemn.

 

The other services (and I’ll include a complete list of music in next week’s Weekly), are:

 

Thurs., March 24, 7:00pm: Maundy Thursday

Fri., March 25, 12:00 Noon: Good Friday liturgy

Fri., March 25, 7:00pm: Downward to Darkness

Sat., March 26, 7:00pm: Great Easter Vigil

Sun., March 27, 9:00 and 11:00am, Easter Day

 

Thanks.  Let the onslaught begin!

 

Tim

_________________

Timothy J. Krueger

Choirmaster, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Denver

Artistic Director, St. Martin’s Chamber Choir (professional)

Affiliate Music Faculty, Metropolitan State University of Denver

10

March 13, 2016 Announcements

Calendar • March 13 to March 19, 2016

 

 

Sunday, March 13

Fifth Sunday in Lent

9:00 am     Holy Eucharist | Church

11:00 am   Solemn Eucharist | Church

5:30 pm     Holy Eucharist | Church

 

 

Thursday, March 17

5:45 pm     Evensong | Church

6:30 pm    Light Supper| Undercroft

7:15 pm     ELF program | Undercroft

 

 

This Week’s News in Brief

For additional information, events and announcements, please check the weekly “Fruits of the Tree”

To view this newsletter online please visit www.standrewdenver.org/church-newsletter

 

Holy Week and Easter at St. Andrew’s

During the week before Easter, we gather as a community to journey with Jesus to Jerusalem and the cross, before celebrating his Resurrection.  The ancient services in which we participate invite us to move away from the routine of our daily lives, and transport us, as we walk the way of the cross, to consider the love of God shown to us in the person of Jesus.  We invite you observe Holy Week with us by participating in this journey.
Sunday, March 20             Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday with the Liturgy of the Palms at 9:00 & 11:00 am, 5:30 pm
Tuesday, March 22           The Way of the Cross at 7:00 pm   On this evening we retrace Jesus’ journey, from his Trial before Pilate and his walk to Golgotha, carrying his Cross, to his Death upon that Cross. Childcare available.
Wednesday, March 23     Tenebrae Service at 7:00 pm   An ancient service in which the lights are extinguished during the chanting of psalms of penitence and lament. Childcare available.
Thursday, March 24          Morning Prayer at 9:00 am
Maundy Thursday Service at 7:00 pm

All night Vigil at the Altar of Repose

On this night, the Church remembers Jesus’ Last Supper with his disciples. With humility, we reenact Jesus’ washing of his disciples’ feet, and we commemorate the Institution of the Lord’s Supper as we celebrate the Eucharist in obedience to his command. Childcare available.
Friday, March 25               Morning Prayer at 9:00 am
Good Friday Service at 12:00 noon   On this most solemn day, we gather at the hour Jesus hung on the cross to pray for the whole world, to venerate the cross, and to share the bread and wine consecrated the night before. Childcare available.
Friday, March 25              Morning Prayer at 9:00 am

Downward to Darkness: Poems, Prayers, and Music for the night of Good Friday at 7:00 pm
On this most solemn night, we’ll gather in the church for a time of meditation and reflection, guided by poetry and music appropriate to the occasion.
Saturday, March 26          Morning Prayer at 9:00 am

Holy Saturday Prayers at 9:00 am   Our community gathers on this morning in a simple prayer service to remember Jesus’ descent into the Grave after which we begin to clean and prepare the Church for the Easter Celebration.
Saturday, March 26          The Great Vigil of Easter at 7:00 pm   This service, traditionally begun at or after sunset, begins the celebration of the Resurrection.  Following a tradition going back to the earliest days of the church, we participate in the Blessing of the New Fire, the Liturgy of the Word, Holy Baptism, and the first Eucharist of Easter, with bells and glorious music.  Our celebration continues with a festive reception in the Undercroft. Childcare available.
Sunday, March 27              Easter Day Services at 9:00 am and 11:00 am
The celebration of the Resurrection continues at these festive services. Childcare available.
Sunday, March 27              There will be no 5:30 pm service.
Monday, March 28            The Parish Office will be closed.

 

Ministry Leadership Transition: Thank you to Rick Larson!

 

For three years, our stewardship ministry has thrived under the able leadership of Rick Larson.  Rick has invited the parish into ever more generous expressions of financial commitment to our mission and ministries.  He has raised the level of our communication, striving for clarity and inspiration in his messages.  During his tenure, we have reached our highest levels ever of pledged support, by every measure: number of households, new pledgers, average pledge, and total amount. And Rick has done all this with a sense of humor, deep thought, and humility.

 

Rick now retires as chair of the ministry, but will continue as part of the ministry team. The new leader of this ministry is Susan Trickett, who has worked closely with Rick on stewardship matters during her time as senior warden.

 

Please thank Rick for his dedication to our parish health and stability through this faithful ministry.

 

Exploring Life and Faith (ELF)

Now through March 17: Our Lenten Journey theme is to “Animate Faith”. Join us to discuss any and all of these short video presentations by a variety of esteemed and provocative spiritual leaders. This week’s topic is:

March 17th:  “Bible: A Book Like No Other” with Lauren Winner; facilitated by Mike Davis
We gather on Thursday nights 7:15 – 8:30. Feel welcome to come for Evensong at 5:45 and Compline following the program.  For more information and the Lenten topic schedule go to www.standrewdenver.org/elf.

 

Daughters of the King

A special invitation is offered to all women to come to an informational meeting about Daughters of the King today after both services.  DOK is a lay order for women of all ages who wish to take vows to prayer and service.  Our motto is: “FOR HIS SAKE I am but one, but I am one. I cannot do everything but I can do something. What I can do, I ought to do. What I ought to do, by the grace of God, I will do.  Lord, what will you have me do?” Mother Melissa and Joyce Culwell, the High Plains Regional Representative will share information which includes a Q and A time.  Interested but can’t make it on the 13th? Please call Joyce at 303-770-2722.

 

Maundy Thursday Vigil

“Could you not watch with me one hour?” says Jesus to his disciples.  If you would like to assist in keeping vigil with the Reserved Sacrament at the altar of Repose on the night of Maundy Thursday (April 17) until the morning of Good Friday, please sign up in the narthex.  Sign up for one hour, or for longer.  Prayer resources and reading material will be available, and we hope to have two people sign up for each hour.

 

The Racial Justice and Reconciliation Taskforce recommends that you enrich your Lenten experience by viewing one or more of the following courses offered by the Trinity Institute.

As you may know, Trinity Institute and ChurchNext are teaming up to help you and your congregation go deeper with one of the most pressing issues of our time.

Based on Trinity Institute’s 2016 conference, Listen for a Change: Sacred Conversations for Racial Justice, a complete Lenten curriculum is being offered including these presenters: Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, PhD., Kelly Brown Douglas, MDiv, PhD., Jennifer Harvey, and J. Kameron Carter, PhD.

All five of these courses have been launched: Spirituality and Racial Justice with Michael Curry; Whiteness and Racial Justice with Kelly Brown Douglas; Reparation and Racial Justice with Jennifer Harvey; Theology and Racial Justice with J. Kameron Carter; and Racism and Racial Justice with Eduardo Bonilla-Silva. All of these will be available in two formats, For Individuals and For Groups.

These courses are free during Lent, 2016 thanks to the generosity of Trinity Institute and The Episcopal Church.

St. Francis Center March Needs
The SFC still has an urgent need for men’s underwear, white crew socks, and adult diapers (Depends).
Additional needs include feminine hygiene products, eyeglasses/readers (can be purchased at Dollar Store), women’s underwear, S, M, L, Vaseline petroleum jelly, paperback books, and shoe laces.

 

Community of Caring: Pastoral Care at St. Andrew’s

The support of a faith community is essential in a time of crisis or personal challenge.    At St. Andrew’s we minister to one another in a variety of ways.  This week we focus on:

 

Prayer Chain: Have a prayer request for yourself or others? Email your request prayers@standrewdenver.org. We have a ministry of members who hold your request in prayer every day.
Contact our partners in ministry if you are in need or if you would like to get involved. If you need immediate pastoral attention, at the time of a death, illness, or other life crisis, please remember that you can call the church number: 303-296-1712. If Jeff answers, ask for the rector’s voice mailbox, and as soon as the message begins, press 1.  You will be connected to a cell phone, where you can leave a message and expect a prompt reply. If the voicemail is on at the church, simply press 1 as soon as the greeting begins, and then press 1 again when the rector’s greeting begins. Please help us to help you by letting us know when you need the support of your community.

 

Do you have News in Brief to share? Please email it to jeff@standrewdenver.org by noon on Wednesday

for inclusion in the following Sunday’s announcements.

 

Expanded news appears each week in St. Andrew’s weekly eMinistry (with its own deadline of Monday at noon) – accessible via the homepage of our website: www.standrewdenver.org.

Musical Weekly March 7, 2016

Musical Weekly

7 March, 2016

In this issue:

·         Errata from last Weekly

·         SMCC guest appearance at MSUD this Sunday

·         Promo video for Charles Wood “St. Mark Passion”

·         This week at St. Andrew’s

_________________

 

In the responses I included to my sermon last week, there were two that got inadvertently run together, making it look like the two were part of the same response from one person.  This would not be a terrible thing if it were not for the fact that one of them self-identified as gay; and, while the other person who erroneously got “outed” is someone I know quite well and I doubt would have a problem with it (he’d probably laugh); and, the people who receive these Weeklys are typically not persons who have an issue with homosexuality, I still think it warranted a correction.  So I’m reposting the two responses, this time separating them as they should be.  My apologies.

 

·         It most definitely struck a chord with me. While I haven’t identified as a Christian for a good 20 years and it is unlikely that I ever will (we can get drunk together sometime and I’ll explain why, lol), I am definitely not an atheist. But even though I’m not a Christian I still find church to be a comfortable place to be regardless of denomination, at least the denominations I’m familiar with (Episcopal, Catholic, Presbyterian, etc.). I’m reminded of a story. I’ve had the (dubious) pleasure to work with Ned Rorem on several occasions. I remember one quite well: It was 1987 and I was doing a week-long composers workshop hosted by the Gregg Smith Singers with which I was singing at the time. It was held at the Ives center in Danbury, CT and Ned was the composer guest of honor. During one of the Q&A sessions with Ned, a young composer asked a very perspicacious question. He asked how such a notorious atheist such as Ned could write such sincerely beautiful sacred music. Ned responded with a soundbite that at the time I found to be both trite and pompous but that I as I get older I find to be quite insightful. He said, “I don’t believe in God, but I believe in Belief.” I think this is why I continue to do church work despite not truly believing in what I’m singing about. I believe in Belief.

 

·         I grew up Evangelical and gay. And I dug my Evangelical heels in very hard until I was in my mid-30s. It’s been a LONG struggle and am still working through things to degree.  Thank you for your candor and for sharing.

_________________

 

As many of you know, my wife MB is the Director of Choral Activities at Metropolitan State University of Denver, where she conducts several choirs, including the top choir, the Chorale.  For the last 4-5 years, St. Martin’s Chamber Choir has been a guest choir at the Chorale’s Spring Concert, and the same is true this year again, the concert being this coming Sunday Evening, March 13, 7:30pm, at the King Center Concert Hall on the Auraria Campus.  The two choirs will sing three joint numbers spaced through the program; and St. Martin’s will be singing a handful of works on our own (five pieces everyone in SMCC has sung before, so they could be put together in one rehearsal!), as follows:

 

Joint works:

Mendelssohn, “Heilig, heilig” (double choir)

Tchaikovsky, Cherubic Hymn No. 3

An African-American Spiritual (I’m really bad at titles of works I’m unfamiliar with, so I don’t remember it!)

 

St. Martin’s’ set:

Palestrina Sicut cervus

Durufle Ubi caritas

Stanford Beati quorum via

Thompson Alleluia

Wood “Full Fathom Five”

 

The concert costs $10, I believe, and will probably be a little more than an hour in length, so not a long one.  If you’re interested, send me a reply to find out what the Chorale is singing by themselves.  I should have gotten the list from MB, but she’s out of town for a couple days at an ACDA Convention in Kansas City, and doubtless too busy having a good time to reply to any queries I might send her.  😉

_________________

 

Here’s a fun little video about the Charles Wood “St. Mark Passion” that I recorded a month or so ago.  Listen to it mainly for the excerpt of Charles Wood’s scrumptious 6-part Latin Nunc dimittis that we used as the background music – not because that piece will appear in the concert, but because it’s the one sacred work by Wood that SMCC has recorded, so it seemed the obvious choice for this video.

 

www.StMartinsChamberChoir.org  (scroll down to the middle of the home page, where it is embedded)

 

Rehearsals are going well, and I am quite moved by the poignancy and power of the work.  Again, as I’ve said a couple times, even if you’re not someone who marks Lent or Holy Week, nor even a Christian, this is one of humankind’s great stories, and, told here in music by Charles Wood, it’s a moving experience, musically and emotionally.  Here are the concert times and venues:

 

·         Fri., March 18, 7:30pm, Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Wheat Ridge

·         Sat., March 19, 7:30pm, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Denver

·         Sun., March 20, 3:00pm, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Denver

 

Tickets may be purchased at the door, or in advance at (303) 298-1970; www.StMartinsChamberChoir.org.  The Sunday matinee concert, historically, tends to be better attended than the other two, so if that’s the day you wish to come, it might be advisable to get tickets in advance.

_________________

 

We continue our Lenten cycle of Fauxbourdon services at Evensong this Thursday, 5:45pm, this one by Thomas Morley.  Rendered by an a cappella quartet – so, very intimate, austere, and solemn:

 

March 10, 2016, 5:45; Choral Evensong: The Thursday in Lent 4

Preces & Responses: Richard Ayleward (1626-1669)

Canticle of Light: “Let my prayer” by John Blow (1649-1708)

Psalm: 73 (plainchant)

Service: Thomas Morley (1577‑1602) “Fauxbourdons”

Anthem: Nolo mortem peccatoris by Thomas Morley (1577‑1602)
Office Hymn: 254 (Wyngate Canon)

 

This coming Sunday is the last Sunday before Holy Week begins, and here’s the music I’ve planned:

 

March 13, 2016, 9 & 11 am; Lent 5

*Introit: “When the Lord turned again” by Adrian Batten (1591‑1637)

Canticle of Praise: Plainchant Kyrie, from the Missa Orbis factor

Anthem: “Like as the hart” by Herbert Howells (1892-1983)

*Fraction Anthem: “Verily, verily I say unto you” by Thomas Tallis (c.1505‑1585)

Communion motet: “King of Glory, King of Peace,” by J. S. Bach (1685‑1750), arr. William H. Harris

Hymns: 675 (Bourbon), *313 (Jesus, meine Zuversicht), 141 (So giebst Du nun), 471 (Breslau)

 

The Howells is one of my very favorite anthems.  The rest is all pretty good, too.  J

 

Tim

_________________

Timothy J. Krueger

Choirmaster, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Denver

Artistic Director, St. Martin’s Chamber Choir (professional)

Affiliate Music Faculty, Metropolitan State University of Denver

10

Musical Weekly February 29, 2016

Musical Weekly
From:
Timothy J. KruegerAdd to Contacts
Sent:
Mon, Feb 29, 2016 at 6:37 pm
To:
Timothy J. Krueger

Musical Weekly

29 February, 2016

In this issue:

· Happy “Leap Day!”

· St. Martin’s “The Passion Story”

· Reactions to my sermon

· This week at St. Andrew’s

_________________

It only comes around once every four years, so it’s fun to recognize it – Happy Leap Day!

_________________

Last week a very joyful bonus was offered to us – Dr. Gregory Robbins (see impressive academic credentials below) offered to give a pre-concert lecture at all three of our March 18-20 concerts involving the St. Mark Passion by Charles Wood. Greg (if I may use his first name, since we are friends) is an expert on the Gospel of Mark, as well as sacred music (he was an organ major at Indiana University before going the religious studies route). He jokingly said he had several hours of material on the Wood St. Mark Passion, so could we have the pre-concert lectures begin about three hours before the concerts. They will actually begin one hour prior to concert time (so, 6:30 on Friday and Saturday, and 2:00 on Sunday), and he’ll just have to abbreviate!

Dr. Greg Robbins is Chair of the Religious Studies department of the University of Denver, Associate Professor of the History of Christianity and its Scriptures, Director of the Anglican Studies Program at the Iliff School of Theology, and Canon Theologian of the Episcopal Diocese of Colorado and St. John’s Cathedral. He is also affiliated with the Center for Judaic Studies at DU.

Here is what he wrote when describing what he would be discussing:

While Mark is considered to be the earliest of the New Testament Gospels and source for Matthew and Luke, it has been relatively neglected in the life of the church for much of Christian history. Until a few decades ago, Mark almost never appeared in the readings assigned for Sunday mornings. Instead, Gospel texts were drawn primarily from Matthew and John (apostles), not Mark or Luke, since they were considered merely “apostolic men.” Little wonder, then, that musical (or theatrical) settings based on Mark are rare—and, thereby, noteworthy. As we prepare to hear the Saint Mark Passion by Charles Wood, this mini-lecture/exploration will remind us of the distinctive features of Mark’s Gospel. Taken on its own terms, Mark, now regarded as the most subtle and enigmatic of all the Gospels, betrays a literary artistry sure to pique our interest and heighten our appreciation of Woods’ accomplishment.

Concerts are as follows:

· Fri., March 18, 7:30pm, Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Wheat Ridge (lecture at 6:30)

· Sat., March 19, 7:30pm, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Denver (lecture at 6:30)

· Sun., March 20, 3:00pm, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Denver (lecture at 2:00)

Get tickets at www.StMartinsChamberChoir.org, or (303) 298-1970

_________________

I got many reactions to the sermon I preached and attached to my Weekly last week. Most were brief “well done”-’s (but highly appreciated by me – my favorite was someone who simply wrote “Amen and Amen”); some printed it out and gave it to their own priest; an entire Education for Ministry group circulated it amongst themselves as it bore on a discussion they were having the previous week; a past-president of the Association of Anglican Musicians suggested I submit it for publication to AAM’s journal (I did, and it was accepted! No word as to what month it will go in, but I was chuffed, needless to say! J); and the following personal responses I am going to reproduce here (slightly edited, and anonymously):

· It literally moved me to tears.

· It most definitely struck a chord with me. While I haven’t identified as a Christian for a good 20 years and it is unlikely that I ever will (we can get drunk together sometime and I’ll explain why, lol), I am definitely not an atheist. But even though I’m not a Christian I still find church to be a comfortable place to be regardless of denomination, at least the denominations I’m familiar with (Episcopal, Catholic, Presbyterian, etc.). I’m reminded of a story. I’ve had the (dubious) pleasure to work with Ned Rorem on several occasions. I remember one quite well: It was 1987 and I was doing a week-long composers workshop hosted by the Gregg Smith Singers with which I was singing at the time. It was held at the Ives center in Danbury, CT and Ned was the composer guest of honor. During one of the Q&A sessions with Ned, a young composer asked a very perspicacious question. He asked how such a notorious atheist such as Ned could write such sincerely beautiful sacred music. Ned responded with a soundbite that at the time I found to be both trite and pompous but that I as I get older I find to be quite insightful. He said, “I don’t believe in God, but I believe in Belief.” I think this is why I continue to do church work despite not truly believing in what I’m singing about. I believe in Belief.I grew up Evangelical and gay. And I dug my Evangelical heels in very hard until I was in my mid-30s. It’s been a LONG struggle and am still working through things to degree. Thank you for your candor and for sharing.

· You know that I come from an Evangelical background, too. I was very involved in my church. I had ten years of private Christian schooling. I’ve always been impressed with how whole and unscathed you seem. I feel like I wear scars from that life like a cloak. I spent a lot of time searching and ten years at a UU church before finding a home in the Episcopal church. There is something about the music and the rituals that comforts me and fills me up. It actually makes my “religious doubts” seem unimportant.

· Being a loyal nonbeliever is a big part of my story too, going back to when I was eight. I was actually a seminary student for a year (at Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria) but was dismayed to find that instead of staying up late discussing whether or how God existed, nobody (that I met, anyway) was interested in such foolishness. To me there is no more fascinating thing to ponder. Best regards from your fellow shallow sherry-sipping creature.

· I too, a composer who has written volumes of sacred and spiritual music, have had grave doubts about the existence of a transcendental deity, especially a Christian “personal savior.” Yet I continue to write such music for at least a couple of reasons: (1) Other composers greater than I have composed fine religious music in the face of similar doubts and (2) I do believe in a “god within” each of us. That is, each human being is divine in some way. See William Blake’s THE DIVINE IMAGE.

· I thoroughly enjoyed your sermon on Sunday. I connected with it because I do not consider myself to be a religious person (or even spiritual, for that matter), but I have attended church for my entire life and deeply appreciate sacred music and other forms of art, as well as many of the stories in the Bible. I love the many architectural designs of holy spaces, too! I was raised in a Presbyterian Church, and both of my parents’ parents were Presbyterian. My father told me that he was agnostic when I was in middle school, and I am not really sure what my scientist mother thinks. I tried to be a Christian until I was a senior in high school, when I decided that I was an absolute atheist. A year later, I realized that it was a little closed-minded of me to deny something that I could not prove. Therefore, since then, I have simply been open-minded, and focus on living a good life by respecting others and being happy. Your personal honesty was very powerful in the setting of the church, and I loved it. I also really liked the way that you organized the sermon with different flashbacks. Your life story is very interesting, and I look forward to hearing about more chapters.

Thanks to all who read and responded. I am truly honored and humbled that my words struck a chord (no pun intended – or perhaps it is!).

_________________

Evensong this Thursday is the first of March (already!! 2016 seems to have just started a couple weeks ago!), so it’s the full choir and organ, rendering the following music:

March 3, 2016, 5:45; Choral Evensong: The Thursday in Lent 3

Preces & Responses: Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656)

Canticle of Light: “Abide with me” by William Sterndale Bennett (1816-1875)

Psalm: 86 (plainchant)

Service: William Byrd “Fauxbourdons”

Anthem: “O how plentiful is thy goodness” by The Rev. Sir Frederick A. G. Ouseley (1825-1889)

Office Hymn: 144 (Cornhill)

A pair of Tudor composers (Tomkins and Byrd), and a pair of Victorians (Sterndale Bennett and Ouseley). The Gospel reading is the feeding of the 5,000, hence the presence of the Ouseley (although there’s an “alleluia” near the end that I am going to have replace with some other text, since alleluia’s are not permitted in Lent). I’m not sure if I’ve ever told this story about where I got the score, and where my interest in Ouseley was born:

When doing my doctorate in England, one of the persons I had the pleasure of befriending was Rodney Williams, a baritone in the choir of Westminster Abbey (“Lay Vicars” is the term they use, I seem to recall), who was also the choir librarian. He is now retired from the Abbey, and I don’t correspond with him as often as I should because he does not do e-mail (Richard Barnes – would you give him my warmest greetings?!). Anyway, one day in the choir school of the Abbey, he pointed at a pile of dusty, worse-for-wear, massive tomes, and asked if I was interested in having one, as they were being tossed. The covers read “Ouseley Anthems and Services,” were dated 1853, and they had been used once-upon-a-time by the choir (so they have fascinating pencil markings in them from Lay Vicars and choristers from the late 19th century, presumably). The sop., alto, and tenor parts all use C-clefs, so they are virtually unusable by today’s singers (plus, I think cathedrals and places like Westminster Abbey currently eschew this sort of literature as “beneath them,” so they were being discarded for more than just being outdated). I searched through the pile and found the one with the least wear-and-tear, and took it. As it’s from 1853, it represents Ouseley’s early work (given his dates above). I have made modern editions of several of them, including the above anthem, and find them eminently singable, pleasant, and largely untinged with the sentimentality and insipid chromaticism of so many Victorian anthems. Not masterworks, to be sure; but worthy of the occasional hearing, yes – at least I think so.

Here’s the musical fare for this coming Sunday:

March 6, 2016, 9 & 11am; Lent 4

*Introit: “O Taste and See” by Ralph Vaughan Williams (1874-1958)

Canticle of Praise: Kyrie, Plainchant, from the Missa Orbis factor

Anthem: “Turn thee unto me” by William Boyce (1710-1779)

*Fraction Anthem: Cibavit eos by William Byrd (1543-1623)

Communion motet: “There’s a wideness in God’s mercy” by Maurice Bevan (1921-2006)

Hymns: 411 (St. Thomas (Williams)), *641 (Southwell), 141 (So Giebst du nun), 489 (Tallis’ Ordinal)

*11:00 only

If I’m not mistaken, I think Maurice Bevan was a singer in the choir of St. Paul’s Cathedral (where they are known as Vicars Choral, I believe. Maybe I’ve got Westminster Abbey and St. Paul’s mixed up, though). This is a lovely little anthem incorporating a hymn tune with which I am not familiar (and if I’m not, you can bet no one in the congregation will be!). Gonna be a good Sunday with RVW, Boyce, and Byrd!

Tim

_________________

Timothy J. Krueger

Choirmaster, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Denver

Artistic Director, St. Martin’s Chamber Choir (professional)

Affiliate Music Faculty, Metropolitan State University of Denver

February 28, 2016 Announcements

Calendar • February 28 – March 6, 2016

Sunday, February 28
Third Sunday in Lent
9:00 am Holy Eucharist | Church
11:00 am Solemn Eucharist | Church
5:30 pm Holy Eucharist | Church

Thursday, March 3
5:45 pm Evensong | Church
6:30 pm Light Supper| Undercroft
7:15 pm ELF program | Undercroft

This Week’s News in Brief
For additional information, events and announcements, please check the weekly “Fruits of the Tree”
To view this newsletter online please visit www.standrewdenver.org/church-newsletter

Our New Children’s Minister

Good news! Zoe Cole has accepted the call to join our community as minister to children and youth. Zoe brings to this task broad experience in Christian formation with children and adults, and she has been a Godly Play teacher and consultant for many years. Zoe will begin her work among us on
March 1st.

Zoe is also a lawyer who works part time as a municipal judge. She will continue to combine those duties with her half time work at St. Andrew’s.

Please join us in welcoming Zoe as she begins her ministry here.

Exploring Life and Faith (ELF)
Now through March 17: Our Lenten Journey theme is to “Animate Faith”. Join us to discuss any and all of these short video presentations by a variety of esteemed and provocative spiritual leaders. This week’s topic is:
• March 3rd: “Salvation: Abundant Life Now” with Shane Hipps; facilitated by Jason Parker
We gather on Thursday nights 7:15 – 8:30. Feel welcome to come for Evensong at 5:45 and Compline following the program.

For more information and the Lenten topic schedule go to www.standrewdenver.org/elf.

Hospitality Ministry:
A New Look for Coffee Hour
Coffee hour is one of the highlights of our life together at St. Andrew’s. And now that we have so many people attending, it’s become more challenging to be a host. The leader of our hospitality ministry, Michael Martinez, has some great ideas for coffee hour. He’s holding a meeting on Sunday, March 6, at 10:20 am in the Common Room of the Parish House. If you are interested in volunteering as a coffee hour host and want to hear about our new plans, please plan on joining us that day!

Daughters of the King
A special invitation is offered to all women to come to an informational meeting about Daughters of the King on March 13 after both services. The meeting following the 9am service will be in the Delzell Room. The meeting after the 11am service will be in the Common Room. DOK is a lay order for women of all ages who wish to take vows to prayer and service. This is a time to hear Mother Melissa and Joyce Culwell, the High Plains Regional Representative, tell you about what Daughters do and it will include a Q & A time. Information and brochures will also be available to take home. Interested but can’t make it on the 13th? Please call Joyce at 303-770-2722.

Young Adults: Join Us Today!
Brunch following the 11 am Service at D-Bar. We will meet and walk together. Not getting emails and want to join this group for 20’s and 30’s? Contact Mother Melissa at melissa@standrewdenver.org

The Racial Justice and Reconciliation Taskforce recommends that you enrich your Lenten experience by viewing one or more of the following courses offered by the Trinity Institute.
As you may know, Trinity Institute and ChurchNext are teaming up to help you and your congregation go deeper with one of the most pressing issues of our time.

Based on Trinity Institute’s 2016 conference, Listen for a Change: Sacred Conversations for Racial Justice, a complete Lenten curriculum is being offered including these presenters: Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, PhD., Kelly Brown Douglas, MDiv, PhD., Jennifer Harvey, and J. Kameron Carter, PhD.
All five of these courses have been launched: Spirituality and Racial Justice with Michael Curry; Whiteness and Racial Justice with Kelly Brown Douglas; Reparation and Racial Justice with Jennifer Harvey; Theology and Racial Justice with J. Kameron Carter; and Racism and Racial Justice with Eduardo Bonilla-Silva. All of these will be available in two formats, For Individuals and For Groups.
These courses are free during Lent, 2016 thanks to the generosity of Trinity Institute and The Episcopal Church.
Community of Caring: Pastoral Care at St. Andrew’s
The support of a faith community is essential in a time of crisis or personal challenge. At St. Andrew’s we minister to one another in a variety of ways. This week we focus on:

• EZ-Rides: Are you unable to drive to church for some reason? Contact Diana Solomon at Diana.Solomon44@gmail.com.

Contact our partners in ministry if you are in need or if you would like to get involved. If you need immediate pastoral attention, at the time of a death, illness, or other life crisis, please remember that you can call the church number: 303-296-1712. If Jeff answers, ask for the rector’s voice mailbox, and as soon as the message begins, press 1. You will be connected to a cell phone, where you can leave a message and expect a prompt reply. If the voicemail is on at the church, simply press 1 as soon as the greeting begins, and then press 1 again when the rector’s greeting begins. Please help us to help you by letting us know when you need the support of your community.

St. Francis Center February Needs
The SFC still has an urgent need for men’s underwear, white crew socks, and adult diapers (Depends).
Additional needs include feminine hygiene products, eyeglasses/readers (can be purchased at Dollar Store), women’s underwear, S, M, L, Vaseline petroleum jelly, paperback books, and shoe laces.

Baroque Chamber Orchestra of Colorado
The final concert of this weekend’s series “Bach Times Three,” is today at 3:00 pm at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village. It features three timeless masterworks of Johann Sebastian Bach performed on period instruments with St. Martin’s Chamber Choir joining the orchestra for two festive cantatas — Wachet auf and Himmelskönig, sei willkommen. The program also includes Bach’s rarely performed concerto for three violins. For more information and tickets, visit www.bcocolorado.org.

Do you have News in Brief to share? Please email it to jeff@standrewdenver.org by noon on Wednesday
for inclusion in the following Sunday’s announcements.

Expanded news appears each week in St. Andrew’s weekly eMinistry (with its own deadline of Monday at noon) – accessible via the homepage of our website: www.standrewdenver.org

February 21, 2016 Announcements

Calendar • February 21 – February 27

Sunday, February 21
Second Sunday in Lent
9:00 am Holy Eucharist | Church
11:00 am Solemn Eucharist | Church
5:30 pm Holy Eucharist | Church

Thursday, February 25
5:45 pm Evensong | Church
6:30 pm Light Supper| Undercroft
7:15 pm ELF program | Undercroft

This Week’s News in Brief
For additional information, events and announcements, please check the weekly “Fruits of the Tree”
To view this newsletter online please visit www.standrewdenver.org/church-newsletter

Exploring Life and Faith (ELF)
Now through March 17: Our Lenten Journey theme is to “Animate Faith”. Join us to discuss any and all of these short video presentations by a variety of esteemed and provocative spiritual leaders. This week’s topic is:
• February 25th: “Jesus: The Revolution of Love”, with Mark Scandrette and facilitated by Jason Parker.
come for Evensong at 5:45, a meal at 6:30 and Compline following the program.
For more information and the Lenten topic schedule go to www.standrewdenver.org/elf.

Imago Divina: Sheltered
Sunday, February 21st at 5:30 pm
Catherine Wiley reads from her play Sheltered, an exploration of the experience of homeless women.

Imago Divina is an exploration of our relationship to the divine through the arts. Each evening begins at 5:30 pm with a presentation from the artist, followed by dinner and conversation, concluding with a brief worship service. This is the third in a five-part series.

Catherine’s plays have been seen in Denver and Omaha, at the Great Plains Theatre Conference, Athena Project Plays in Progress series, and Toto Too Company’s Play Crawl, One Night Stand and other venues. She studied community-based theater at Cornerstone Theater Company in Los Angeles, working on the production of At-Traction in the Los Angeles Arts District. She teaches American and British Drama and women writers in the English Department at the University of Colorado Denver. Catherine is a proud member of The Dramatists Guild of America and the Colorado Theatre Guild. Her daughter, Claire, who was baptized as a baby at St. Andrew’s, is a college sophomore.

Daughters of the King
A special invitation is offered to all women to come to an informational meeting about Daughters of the King on March 13 after both services in the undercroft. DOK is a lay order for women of all ages who wish to take vows to prayer and service. This is a time to hear Mother Melissa and Joyce Culwell, the High Plains Regional Representive, tell you about what Daughters do and it will include a Q and A time. Information and brochures will also be available to take home. Interested but can’t make it on the 13th? Please call Joyce at 303-770-2722.
Young Adults: Save the Date!
March 6: Brunch following the 11 am Service. Check your emails for more info Not getting emails and want to join this group for 20’s and 30’s? Contact Mother Melissa.

The Racial Justice and Reconciliation Taskforce recommends that you enrich your Lenten experience by viewing one or more of the following courses offered by the Trinity Institute.
As you may know, Trinity Institute and ChurchNext are teaming up to help you and your congregation go deeper with one of the most pressing issues of our time.

Based on Trinity Institute’s 2016 conference, Listen for a Change: Sacred Conversations for Racial Justice, a complete Lenten curriculum is being offered including these presenters: Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, PhD., Kelly Brown Douglas, MDiv, PhD., Jennifer Harvey, and J. Kameron Carter, PhD.
All five of these courses have been launched: Spirituality and Racial Justice with Michael Curry; Whiteness and Racial Justice with Kelly Brown Douglas; Reparation and Racial Justice with Jennifer Harvey; Theology and Racial Justice with J. Kameron Carter; and Racism and Racial Justice with Eduardo Bonilla-Silva. All of these will be available in two formats, For Individuals and For Groups.
These courses are free during Lent, 2016 thanks to the generosity of Trinity Institute and The Episcopal Church.
Community of Caring: Pastoral Care at St. Andrew’s
The support of a faith community is essential in a time of crisis or personal challenge. At St. Andrew’s we minister to one another in a variety of ways. This week we focus on:

• A Meal that Heals: Do not worry about sustenance when illnesses or surgeries arise. A Meal that Heals provides you and your family a meal to make healing easier. Contact Barbara Day to request a meal.

Contact our partners in ministry if you are in need or if you would like to get involved. If you need immediate pastoral attention, at the time of a death, illness, or other life crisis, please remember that you can call the church number: 303-296-1712. If Jeff answers, ask for the rector’s voice mailbox, and as soon as the message begins, press 1. You will be connected to a cell phone, where you can leave a message and expect a prompt reply. If the voicemail is on at the church, simply press 1 as soon as the greeting begins, and then press 1 again when the rector’s greeting begins. Please help us to help you by letting us know when you need the support of your community.

St. Francis Center February Needs:
The SFC still has an urgent need for men’s underwear,
white crew socks, and adult diapers (Depends).
Additional needs include feminine hygiene products,
eyeglasses/readers (can be purchased at Dollar Store),
women’s underwear, S, M, L, Vaseline petroleum jelly, paperback books, and shoe laces.

Baroque Chamber Orchestra of Colorado
On February 26-28 the Baroque Chamber Orchestra of Colorado directed by Frank Nowell presents “Bach Times Three,” featuring three timeless masterworks of Johann Sebastian Bach performed on period instruments. St. Martin’s Chamber Choir joins the orchestra for two festive cantatas — Wachet auf and Himmelskönig, sei willkommen. The program also includes Bach’s rarely performed concerto for three violins. The concert is presented three times: Friday, February 26 at 7:30 pm at Regis University in Denver, Saturday, February 27 at 7:30 pm at the King Center in Denver, and Sunday, February 28 at 3:00 pm at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village. For more information and tickets, visit www.bcocolorado.org.

Do you have News in Brief to share? Please email it to jeff@standrewdenver.org by noon on Wednesday
for inclusion in the following Sunday’s announcements.
Expanded news appears each week in St. Andrew’s weekly eMinistry (with its own deadline of Monday at noon) – accessible via the homepage of our website: www.standrewdenver.org.

February 14, 2016 Announcements

Calendar • February 14 – February 20

Sunday, February 14
First Sunday in Lent
9:00 am Holy Eucharist | Church
11:00 am Solemn Eucharist | Church
5:30 pm Holy Eucharist | Church

Monday, February 15
Office closed in observance of Presidents’ Day
Thursday, February 18
5:45 pm Evensong | Church
6:30 pm ELF| Undercroft
6:45 pm Kids’ Choir Rehearsal | Common Room

This Week’s News in Brief
For additional information, events and announcements, please check the weekly “Fruits of the Tree”
To view this newsletter online please visit www.standrewdenver.org/church-newsletter

Exploring Life and Faith (ELF)
Now through March 17: Our Lenten Journey theme is to “Animate Faith”. Join us to discuss any and all of these short video presentations by a variety of esteemed and provocative spiritual leaders. This week’s topic is:
• 18: “Religion: Spirituality Is Not Enough” with Lillian Daniel, facilitated by Rev’d Melissa Adzima
We gather on Thursday nights 7:15 – 8:30. Feel welcome to come for Evensong at 5:45, a meal at 6:30 and Compline following the program.
For more information and the Lenten topic schedule go to www.standrewdenver.org/elf.

Volunteer Opportunities with Family Promise
St. Andrew’s Rotation for Family Promise is the week of February 21 – February 28. Again, we are asked by The First Unitarian Church (14th and Lafayette Streets) to provide support while the families are housed at their church. Thank you to all who have volunteered. There are a few opportunities still available:

Thursday Overnight (2/25) @ 8:00 PM to 7:00 AM- 2 people. We are provided a private room with beds and clean linens.

Saturday breakfast (2/27) @ 8:30-9:30. One person is needed to complete the team of 4 people. Prepare and serve. Eat with the families and clean-up.

We have been a partner with First Unitarian Church for over 10 years. They would not be able to provide this outreach without our help. These are families that for one reason or another are without housing and some without employment. Family Promise has a high percentage of helping them find housing and employment. All of this takes many hands.
If you are able to help, please sign up on the schedule that is on the Coffee table in the Undercroft.
Any questions, contact Lynne Valentine @ lkval@yahoo.com or call 303 955 6911.
Thank you for considering to help.
Greeters’ Retreat: Interested in the ministry of Welcome? Participating as a Greeter currently?
You are invited to a morning of community, training, and spiritual reflection on what it means to be a Greeter at St. A’s. We will gather together Saturday, February 20th from 9am until Noon. We will start our morning with breakfast at 9am in the Common Room of the Parish House. Email Nancy Panter at nlpanter@msn.com for more information and to let her know you’ll be joining us.

Young Adults: Save the Date!
March 6: Brunch following the 11 am Service. Check your emails for more info.

The Racial Justice and Reconciliation Taskforce recommends that you enrich your Lenten experience by viewing one or more of the following courses offered by the Trinity Institute.
As you may know, Trinity Institute and ChurchNext are teaming up to help you and your congregation go deeper with one of the most pressing issues of our time.

Based on Trinity Institute’s 2016 conference, Listen for a Change: Sacred Conversations for Racial Justice, a complete Lenten curriculum is being offered including these presenters: Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, PhD., Kelly Brown Douglas, MDiv, PhD., Jennifer Harvey, and J. Kameron Carter, PhD.
All five of these courses have been launched: Spirituality and Racial Justice with Michael Curry; Whiteness and Racial Justice with Kelly Brown Douglas; Reparation and Racial Justice with Jennifer Harvey; Theology and Racial Justice with J. Kameron Carter; and Racism and Racial Justice with Eduardo Bonilla-Silva. All of these will be available in two formats, For Individuals and For Groups.
These courses are free during Lent, 2016 thanks to the generosity of Trinity Institute and The Episcopal Church.
Community of Caring: Pastoral Care at St. Andrew’s
The support of a faith community is essential in a time of crisis or personal challenge. At St. Andrew’s we minister to one another in a variety of ways. This week we focus on:

• Eucharistic Visits: Eucharistic Visitors bring communion to you if you are in the hospital, homebound, or struggling with a chronic illness. Contact Diana Solomon.

Contact our partners in ministry if you are in need or if you would like to get involved. If you need immediate pastoral attention, at the time of a death, illness, or other life crisis, please remember that you can call the church number: 303-296-1712. If Jeff answers, ask for the rector’s voice mailbox, and as soon as the message begins, press 1. You will be connected to a cell phone, where you can leave a message and expect a prompt reply. If the voicemail is on at the church, simply press 1 as soon as the greeting begins, and then press 1 again when the rector’s greeting begins. Please help us to help you by letting us know when you need the support of your community.

St. Francis Center February Needs:
The SFC still has an urgent need for men’s underwear,
white crew socks, and adult diapers (Depends).
Additional needs include feminine hygiene products,
eyeglasses/readers (can be purchased at Dollar Store),
women’s underwear, S, M, L, Vaseline petroleum jelly, paperback books, and shoe laces.

Do you have News in Brief to share? Please email it to jeff@standrewdenver.org by noon on Wednesday
for inclusion in the following Sunday’s announcements.
Expanded news appears each week in St. Andrew’s weekly eMinistry (with its own deadline of Monday at noon) – accessible via the homepage of our website: www.standrewdenver.org.

Musical Weekly February 22, 2016

Musical Weekly

22 February, 2016

In this issue:

· My sermon

· SMCC and BCOC together this weekend

· This week at St. Andrew’s

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I have attached my sermon below for anyone who might be interested in reading the reflections of a person beset with religious doubts but who still finds himself moved by religious art, sacred music, beauty, and liturgy. I was touched after the service by the number of people who told me it had affected them, and that it connected with some part of their own spiritual biography. St. Andrew’s seems to be a place heavily populated with such seekers – former Evangelicals, former Catholics, former “nothings,” who cannot bring themselves to accept many tenets of traditional religion, yet find themselves irresistibly attracted to things divine, and find St. Andrew’s to be a place that’s sympathetic and open to their questions. Perhaps this is one reason Elizabeth our rector lets me preach once a year – to connect with those whose religious beliefs are difficult to ascertain, but whose yearning for transcendent meaning finds itself drawn to the mystical and aesthetic side of Anglican spirituality. Anyway, for what it’s worth, the sermon is attached.

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This weekend sees St. Martin’s Chamber Choir joining the Baroque Chamber Orchestra of Colorado in a program entitled “Bach Times Three.” There are three works on the program; and one of those works is Bach’s rarely heard concerto for three violins. The works that include SMCC are two cantatas, Nos. 140 (Wachet auf), and 182 (Himmelskönig, sei willkommen). As can be expected from two ensembles of this caliber, the quality and passion of the concert will be high, and I heartily recommend your attendance. Tickets to be had through BCOC: www.bcocolorado.org

· Fri., Feb. 26, 7:30pm, Regis University, N. Denver

· Sat, Feb. 27, 7:30pm, King Center, Auraria Campus, Central Denver

· Sun., Feb. 28, 3:00pm, Bethany Lutheran, Cherry Hills Village

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Choral Evensong this Thursday is of the intimate variety, sung by an a cappella quartet, with music as follows:

February 25, 2016, 5:45pm, Choral Evensong: The Thursday in Lent 2

Preces & Responses: Krueger

Canticle of Light: “O Lord, the maker of all things” by William Mundy (d. 1591)

Psalm: 74 (plainchant)

Service: John Holmes (c. 1600) “Fauxbourdons”

Anthem: “Drop, drop slow tears” by Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625)

Office Hymn: 152 (A la venue de Noël)

This is the next in my series of “Fauxbourdons” services – perhaps my favorite of the lot. Nothing much known about John Holmes, though. Two other Tudor works by Mundy and Gibbons round it out (the latter is a contrafactum of his madrigal “The Silver Swan”).

Then comes the Third Sunday in Lent, which includes the following (Ralph Valentine is back):

February 28, 2016, 9 & 11am; Lent 3

Introit: “Thou knowest, Lord” by Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

Anthem: “Lord, let me know mine end” by Maurice Greene (c.1695-1755)

Fraction Anthem: “Verily, verily I say unto you” by Thomas Tallis (c.1505‑1585)

Communion motet: “Lord, for thy tender mercy’s sake” by Richard Farrant (d. 1581) (or John Hilton [d. 1608])

Hymns: 574 (St. Petersburg), *386 (Cornwall), 332 (St. Flavian), 344 (Sicilian Mariners)

Good line-up of music this week, I think. I have a special affection for the Greene.

All the best!

Tim

SERMON

21 February, 2016, Lent 2
Genesis 15:1-12, 17-18
Psalm 27
Philippians 3:17-4:1
Luke 13:31-35

“One thing have I asked of the Lord; one thing I seek – to behold the fair beauty of the Lord, and to seek him in his temple.” (Ps. 27:5-6)

I’d like to present four scenes from my life. For these to make sense, you need to know that I was raised the son of a Baptist minister, and attended Wheaton College, an Evangelical institution; and that I was an avid and enthusiastic adherent of conservative Christianity until my early 20’s.

The first scene occurs in September, at the beginning of my junior year at Wheaton, during a nocturnal walk. It was a stormy, windy night, and, with the growing realization that I was having difficulty accepting many of the religious tenets of my upbringing, the weather proved an appropiate metaphor of my mental state. Foremost was my philosophical inability to reconcile the sovereignty of a benevolent God with the simultaneous existence of evil and suffering. It has been variously called The Problem of Evil, the Problem of Suffering, or Theodicy – why a good God permits evil. Simply put, this growing sense of a contradiction and inconsistency within the Christian world view had brought me to an impasse. Throw in questions of sexuality and an evolving political sense, and I was shaken to my core, my very identity in question.

By the time this stormy walk was over, I had acknowledged that I was no longer a Christian. This avowal was at first frightening, but over time it became easier, and even pricked a nascent sense of joy in the exercise of my intellectual freedom.

The second scene occurs a little over a year later. My atheism, as I saw it, had led me to leave Wheaton and come back to the state where I had grown up in order to finish university. I was now nearing the end of my senior year at the University of Colorado in Boulder. I had taken a job as a staff-singer at St. John’s Cathedral. It was a good way to use my musical skills and be surrounded by quality music; and as far as all that religious stuff went, I had resolved just to ignore those parts of the experience. Plus, the fact that I was attending an Episcopal church I knew got under my Baptist father’s skin, so this was all to the good.

One day when I was sitting in the choir stalls, the preacher made this statement: “If love and doctrine should ever come into conflict, one of them must prevail.” Yep, I knew the answer to that one – doctrine. I’d heard my dad say it many times – love is an emotion, throroughly unreliable in determining human actions. Right-belief, or doctrine, must prevail. So what was my surpise when the preacher went on to say, “If love and doctrine should ever come into conflict, LOVE must prevail.”

What?! This was unthinkable! No wonder my dad thought Episcopalians were wishy-washy, back-slidden, seed-on-rocky-ground, sherry-sipping shallow creatures. But the preacher’s statement opened up a tiny chink of light at the end of a tunnel – opened up another way forward for me. It demonstrated that there was a different kind of Christianity than what I was familiar with. I wasn’t sure whether it answered any more questions regarding Theodicy or the Problem of Evil. But it did more closely square with my evolving, post-Evangelical world view.

Scene Three: Four more years have passed. I am mid-way through a doctorate at the University of London. Strangely, given my continuing tendency towards atheism and the inability to reconcile the idea of a good God permitting evil and suffering, my doctoral thesis is in the field of sacred music. Strangely, given my continuing tendency towards atheism, I had never ceased attending church weekly. When asked to explain this dichotomy, I have been known to quip to my bemused friends the reverse of that well-known phrase, “I’m religious but not spiritual.”

One Sunday morning found me seated in the congregation of St. George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle. Having been recently plagued with a few uncertainties about my health (and my tendency towards psychosomatic exaggeration having magnified them into almost certain terminal illnesses), I was pondering the unfairness of this godless universe, and the uncertainty of life. In this gloomy state of mind, I recall asking myself with frustration, “Why am I sitting here? Why do I still come to church? I don’t believe any of this stuff and nonsense, so why do I still slavishly attend? I can’t pretend to worship something I don’t believe exists.”

I looked up at the breath-taking fan-vaulting of St. George’s, listening to Stanford’s Te Deum in C as it reverberated magnificently around the Gothic tracery and arches, and heard the following voice in my head: “You may not worship God, but you worship Good. There is something transcendent that you can’t explain when you enter an edifice such as this, and hear music such as this; and that is what you pay homage to; that is what you love; that is the Ground of your Being; that is God.”

Someone asked me once whether I think this was the voice of God speaking to me in St. George’s. In the traditional sense, no. But that it was some divinely-linked part of myself, or something in my soul that yearns for transcendent meaning, or the Spirit that speaks to me through beauty, yes. Definitley yes.

So I return to the words of the Psalmist sung today by the choir – “One thing have I asked of the Lord; one thing I seek – to behold the fair beauty of the Lord, and to seek him in his temple.” And I see my 24-year-old self sitting in St. George’s Chapel, asking this one thing fervently of the Lord. That I still sought God in the temple, attending church faithfully despite an intellectual conviction that such a God did not exist, makes these words of the Psalmist resonate deeply within me. And that the thing most fervently sought by the psalmist was to behold beauty – this is confirmation that the voice I heard in my head was not a deceptive one, not an empty one.

And this leads me to the Fourth Scene, which is not really a scene at all, but the summation of some recent deliberations and ponderings. Over the 25 years since my experience in St. George’s Chapel, I have returned to that moment, and several others that have briefly parted the veil that obscures the trascendent in the mundane, to sustain me when my agnosticism threatens to overwhelm my halting faith. And recently I’ve found myself quite moved by the thought of the Incarnation – of the idea that God took on human flesh; that the Divine became mortal. I have always been more moved by, more enthusiastic about, Christmas than Easter – that is to say, the Incarnation than the Redemption. The Baptist part of my upbringing sometimes castigates myself for this; but recently I read something by William Temple, Archbishop of Canterbury during World War II, who wrote that the Incarnation meant that “the personality of every man and woman is sacred.” That it was (in my paraphrase) not the cross that redeemed human kind, but the manger. This emphasis on the Incarnation as the essential moment in “the drama of salvation” is a hallmark of Anglicanism, and therefore has sometimes been called “the Anglican heresy.” But it is a concept that I have come wholeheartedly to embrace.

And I have gone further in this line of reasoning recently in thinking that the idea of God’s taking on of physical substance hallows that physical substance; and, therefore, that the Incarnation affirms the delight we take in earthly beauty. The duality of Platonic thought, which holds that the material world is evil and the spiritual good, is nullified by the Incarnation. And therefore beauty itself, which is the physical world in its most perfect manifestation, is divine. And finally, therefore, that “to behold the fair beauty of the Lord, and to seek him in his temple,” is the highest that one such as I, with all my wranglings and imperfections and doubts, can strive for in this life.

And therefore I do. I strive to behold the fair beauty of the Lord, through music and art and poetry. And I still seek him here in this temple, in the architecture and acoustics of this beautiful space. Today’s Gospel concludes with the words “Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord.” Perhaps showing up is the best thing one can do, and then just letting God see to the rest. Perhaps this regard for beauty is my heresy. Perhaps it is a sign of my weakness. But I hope, and even dare to pray, that God honor it as the best that I can do.

8 February, 2016 Musical Weekly

8 February, 2016

In this issue:

  • Martin’s “Chant: Mystery and Mysticism” THIS WEEKEND
  • This week at St. Andrew’s (Ash Weds., Lent begins)

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Here are the program notes I wrote for this weekend’s St. Martin’s concerts.  Hope to see you there!

 

As part of the Counter-Reformation (the Roman Catholic Church’s attempt to win back straying Protestants in the 17th century) elaborate and sumptuous liturgies were approved in many locales, including Paris, where it was allowed that the organist could play music that would substitute for portions of the Ordinary of the Mass.  The foremost examples of this French Baroque extravagance are the two Organ Masses by François Courperin (1668-1733), later organist to King Louis XIV.  Each an hour in length, when added to the liturgies themselves they must have caused services to exceed two hours!  Excerpted here is the Kyrie from the Mass for the Parishes, which presents the Gregorian Chant from the Missa Cunctipotens Genitor Deus alternating with organ passages which replace portions of the nine-fold Kyrie.  The opening and closing movements of the organ portions quote the plainchant melody in the pedal, thus linking the organ movements more closely to the liturgy it was a part of.

 

Joaquín Nin-Culmell, third child of Cuban composer-pianist Joaquín Nin y Castellanos and Franco-Spanish singer Rosa Culmell (their eldest child was the celebrated but controversial writer Anaïs Nin), grew up in Barcelona, and studied at the Paris Conservatoire under Paul Dukas.  His fellow students included Olivier Messiaen, Jean Langlais, and Jehan Alain.  He continued his studies privately in Granada with Manuel de Falla.  In 1939 he emigrated to the United States, where he spent the remainder of his career as a music professor at a variety of American colleges and universities (culminating in his chairing of the music department at the University of California at Berkeley).  Professing a “faithful Catholic heart,” Nin-Culmell turned increasingly in later life to sacred works, including a Mass, a Te Deum, and the mystical and powerful work for alternating Organ and Gregorian Chant heard tonight, Symphonie des Mystères, an extended meditation on the fifteen Mysteries of the Rosary.  These fifteen Mysteries essentially trace episodes in the life of Christ – or, more accurately, the liturgical year – and, when recited as devotions, are interspersed with sequences of the Lord’s Prayer and Hail Marys.  The listener is taken from the Annunciation (Mary being told she is to bear Jesus) through Christmas and the Presentation (when the child was presented 40 days after birth, according to Jewish custom, in the Temple – February 2) to the Passion and Crucifixion; and thence, through the Resurrection, Ascension, and Pentecost, to various feasts associated with Mary’s beatification.

 

A few of the organ passages draw from the Gregorian chant that accompanies them, or even quote other related melodies (the Christmas carol Il est né!, for example); but the majority are freely composed meditations and reflections on the specific Mystery that the chant points to or portrays (the repeated rhythmic figure in the Les Coups represents the lashes administered to Christ during his scourging, for example).

 

The work was first performed in its entirety in 1994, and recorded for the first time, in the presence of the composer, by Richard Robertson and the men of St. Martin’s Chamber Choir on October 12, 1997.   This is the first time St. Martin’s has performed it since that recording, and we are thrilled to return to the work with Richard Robertson.

 

The concerts are Friday, February 12, 7:30pm at St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral (1400 Washington St.), and Sunday, February 14, 3:00pm at St. Paul’s Lutheran (Community of Faith, 1600 Grant St.).  Both places have marvelous acoustics and great organs.  I marginally prefer the organ at St. John’s but the acoustic at St. Paul’s, so take your pick!

 

Tickets may be purchased at the door, or in advance at (303) 298-1970; www.StMartinsChamberChoir.org/tickets

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Ash Wednesday falls on a Wednesday this year, specifically the day-after-tomorrow.  At St. Andrew’s we have two services to mark the day and smudge people’s foreheads with reminders of their mortality: Noon and 7:00pm.  At the Noon service I have an octet, and at 7:00pm the full choir (two-dozen-some singers) – both services are a cappella, including the hymns.  Here’s the music I’ve planned – a model of somber beauty:

 

February 10, 2016, Ash Wednesday (Noon and 7:00pm)

At the Imposition of Ashes: Per signum crucis by Thomas Tallis (c.1505-1585)

Anthem: “Hear my prayer, O Lord” by Henry Purcell (1659-1695)

Sanctus: [Don Warner Sanctus from “Mass for Penitential Seasons”]

¯Fraction Anthem: “Verily, verily I say unto you” by Thomas Tallis (c.1505‑1585)

Communion motet: Sicut cervus by G. P. da Palestrina (1525‑1594)

Hymns: 149 (Old 124th), 411 (St. Thomas (Williams)), 152 (A la venue de Noël), 142 (St. Flavian)

 

The next day is Thursday, and the first Evensong of Lent takes place at the usual time (5:45pm).  According to the Prayer Book, this is the “Thursday in the Last Week of Epiphany,” but I’ve always thought this a misnomer, as it is in Lent and not Epiphany.  So around here we call it “The Thursday after Ash Wednesday.”  An austere quartet performs the following lineup:

 

February 11, 2016, Choral Evensong: The Thursday after Ash Wednesday

Preces & Responses: Michael Gibson (2011)

Canticle of Light: “Lord, we beseech thee” by Adrian Batten (1591-1637)

Psalm: 37, Pt 1 (plainchant)

Service: Carolus Andreas (16th C.) “Fauxbourdons” Service

Anthem: “Let my complaint come before thee” by Adrian Batten (1591‑1637)

Office Hymn: 144 (Cornhill)

 

The fact that Carolus Andreas was an Englishman leads me to believe his actual name was Charles Andrews – anyone ever heard of him?  Nice little fauxbourdons service (alternating chanted verses with harmonized verses where the chant is in the tenor or soprano, although sometimes I can’t find any hint of the chant).  I’ve programmed a fauxbourdons service for every Evensong in Lent this year – Morely, Byrd, Holmes, and even a couple modern ones by Charles Wood and Healey Willan.

 

Here’s the music for the first Sunday of Lent (organ’s back):

 

February 14, 2016, 9:00 and 11:00am; Lent 1

Great Litany: chant harmonized by Steve Kick (2001)

Anthem: “Out of the deep” by Thomas Morley (1557-1608)

Fraction Anthem: “Verily, verily I say unto you” by Thomas Tallis (c.1505‑1585)

Communion motet: “Almighty and everlasting God” by Orlando Gibbons (1583‑1625)

Hymns: 143 (Erhalt uns, Herr), 150 (Aus der Tiefe rufe ich), 688 (Ein feste Burg)

 

This service begins with a long, chanted bit of self-flaggelation in procession around the church.  Nicely solemn, but sometimes I tire of it.  Still, I’m always amused when I reflect that one line that has been removed from this oldest of all Reformation English prayers is “From the bishop of Rome and all his detestable enormities, Good Lord, deliver us.”  (!!).  I hope they don’t still sing/say that one anywhere in the Anglican Communion…?

 

MB puts on her best imitation of a counter-tenor in the Morley (and it’s pretty good J), so fans of MB in the Gibbons “This is the record of John” take note!

 

All the best to all; and if you are one who marks Lent, may it be a time of meditative self-examination and spiritual renewal.

 

Tim

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